/robowaifu/ - DIY Robot Wives

Advancing robotics to a point where anime catgrill meidos in tiny miniskirts are a reality.

LynxChan updated to 2.5.7, let me know whether there are any issues (admin at j dot w).


Reports of my death have been greatly overestimiste.

Still trying to get done with some IRL work, but should be able to update some stuff soon.

#WEALWAYSWIN

Max message length: 6144

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 5 files / Maximum size: 20.00 MB

More

(used to delete files and postings)


Welcome to /robowaifu/, the exotic AI tavern where intrepid adventurers gather to swap loot & old war stories...


Open file (93.53 KB 800x540 TypesOfMotors.jpg)
Open file (318.41 KB 773x298 NylonActuator.png)
Open file (29.01 KB 740x400 BasicPiston.jpg)
Open file (821.22 KB 850x605 MadoMecha.png)
Actuators For Waifu Movement Part 2 Waifu Boogaloo Kiwi 09/02/2021 (Thu) 05:30:48 No.12810
(Original thread >>406) Kiwi back from the dead with a thread for the discussion of actuators that move your waifu! Part Two! Let's start with a quick refresher! 1. DC motors, these use a rotating magnetic field created through commutation to rotate a rotor! They're one of the cheapest options and are 30 to 70 percent efficient usually. The bigger they are, the more efficient they tend to be. 2. Brushless motors, these use a controller to induce a rotating magnetic field by turning electromagnets on and off in a sequence. They trend 60 to 95 percent efficiency 3. AC motors, Though there are many different type, they function similarly to brushless motors, they simply rely on the AC electricity to turn their electromagnets on and off to generate their field. Anywhere from 15 to 95 percent efficiency. 4. Stepper motors, brushless motors with ferrous teeth to focus magnetic flux. This allows for incredible control at the cost of greater mass and lower torque at higher speeds. Usually 50 to 80 percent efficient but, this depends on control algorithm/speed/and quality of the stepper. 5. Coiled Nylon Actuators! These things have an efficiency rating so low it's best to just say they aren't efficient. What they are though is dirt cheap and easy as heck to make! Don't even think about them, I did and it was awful. 6. Hydraulics! These rely on the distribution of pressure in a working liquid to move things like pistons. Though popular in large scale industry, their ability to be used in waifu's has yet to be proven. (Boston Dynamics Atlas runs on hydraulics but, it's a power guzzler and heavy) 7. Pneumatics, hydraulics lighter sister! This time the fluid is air! This has the advantage in weight. They aren't capable of the same power loads hydraulics are but, who wants their waifu to bench press a car? 8. Wax motors, hydraulic systems where the working fluid is expanding melted parafin wax! Cheap, low power, efficient, and produce incredible torque! Too bad they're slow and hard to control. 9. Explosion! Yes, you can move things through explosions! Gas engines work through explosions! Artificial muscles can be made by exploding a hydrogen and oxygen mixture in a piston, then using hydrolysis to turn the water back into hydrogen and oxygen. None of this is efficient or practical but, it's vital we keep our minds open. Though there are more actuators, most are derivatives or use these examples to work. Things like pulleys need an actuator to move them. Now, let's share, learn, and get our waifu moving! >--- < add'l, related links from Anon: >Soft muscles with origami-inspired skeletons: https://youtu.be/OJO4FP0DXgQ >Cavatappi artificial muscles: https://youtu.be/yXAJGH5s4cs https://youtu.be/MpCFumHFZvU https://www.designnews.com/automation/cavatappi-robot-muscles-have-5-times-strength-human-muscles >Nameless nanofiber muscle, probably Cavatappi: https://youtu.be/H19p43NFqp4 >Supercoiled polymer (SPC) muscles: https://youtu.be/QHiTJ_zgGME https://youtu.be/N4VMoYFrusg https://youtu.be/hFuzQ4ed-t0 https://youtu.be/2GXWIozM4oQ (bundled/braided) >TCP (the same?) https://youtu.be/S4-3_DnKE9E https://youtu.be/wltLEzQnznM >Twisted string actuators (TSA) <I had the idea that they should in some cases be build with a loop. Grippers would hold a part of it and twist that. For fast release they coul let it go and grab the next part of the loop. Designing the gripper will be a bit of a challenge, though. But I think this is doable. Can't image I'm the first having that idea. <Not sure if this here >>12589 is already something like it bc I didn't understand it. <Here's some passive returning mechanism, followed by other videos on TSAs: https://youtu.be/J26y1nn7JMM https://youtu.be/QBQMZsSQJQM (freaking loud) Effect of bending: https://youtu.be/zYrHGMiqC9A Life cycle test setup: https://youtu.be/PABVsuV7Y1M Frequency response ( I don't get it): https://youtu.be/YLWsh1P80Dc Mixed with fluid/gel tube: https://youtu.be/tP9B3aqc4CI Transmission ratio and speed switch: https://youtu.be/Y1uceDzhjKY https://youtu.be/5PtXTI1t3Po <I don't like it being used for fingers but it's a good technology. >Nylon fishing line muscles: https://youtu.be/Za0VeU9Ov7A https://youtu.be/2OuRX65xbKE <(Reminder: The do have a high life span >1M) <I plan to rather use water for heating and cooling. >Continuous ransmission (CVT) / torque converters https://youtu.be/kVPjhmTThPo https://youtu.be/cd2-vsTzd9E https://youtu.be/c9e2y-5DMNc https://youtu.be/PEq5_b4LWNY >Twisted string series elastic actuator (TsSEA) <This strikes me as particular interesting. https://youtu.be/VBXykAIBKtA >Printed pneumatics https://youtu.be/_X0rDW6NQ58 >Using sugar as soluble support material for printing silicone muscles: https://youtu.be/L0Z0-y3qpNk >=== -add add'l links
Edited last time by Chobitsu on 09/06/2021 (Mon) 10:07:57.
>>12940 >>Did you know you can make piezos out of PVC. Like the water pipe stuff? You heat it up, ... Aarrgh!!1! DO NOT HEAT UP PVC. >>5106 >>9043
>>12940 >>voltage transformer made of piezos I mean the regular electronics ones. Boost converters is another name for those, wich can be buyed as a board, or build: https://youtu.be/QnUhjnbZ0T8 --write-sub https://youtu.be/hDZsBeYbDa4 --write-sub (Just in case, if anyone tries to get the inductor the same way, don't damage the lightbulb bc mercury) Btw, we don't need to build everything from the scratch. It's good to be able to, but doing so might also complicate things. If you want too make even the chrystals yourself: https://youtu.be/IGbVGKJldd8 >>12941 >cone gear or cone torque converter Interesting, but I would like to see an experiment based on it. Also, space might be an issue.
>>12947 >Aarrgh!!1! DO NOT HEAT UP PVC. I hate to be so blunt but the fact is you have no idea what you are talking about at all. Plumbers, electricians bend PVC by heating it up all the time.Here's a search for PVC heater bender. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=pvc+heater+bender&t=ffcm&ia=web They make a tool just for this.
>>12948 >Boost converters is another name for those, wich can be buyed as a board, or build I see thirty of them here for $20 https://www.banggood.com/30pcs-DC-2V-24V-To-5V-28V-2A-Step-Up-Boost-Converter-Power-Supply-Module-Adjustable-Regulator-Board-p-1614240.html?cur_warehouse=CN&rmmds=search but...what will you drive with them? If it's a motor then you have to make a bigger motor which cost big time. Also these little cheap things I don't think are going to drive piezos which to really drive them require much higher voltage. I'm not trying to be totally negative. I just don't think this will work out. If you look back at what I've posted a lot of it really won't work or will be so tedious that it will be too much of a pain but I throw ideas out there anyways.
>>12983 Doesn't mean it's healthy, especially if you want to do it on abigger scale. >>12984 The topic wasn't motors but dielectric muscles and small piezoelectric valves or such. My point was, that these boosters exist and some might work. One goes up to 500V from 3V.
>>12987 >The topic wasn't motors but dielectric muscles Ok I didn't see that. It wasn't clear to me.
>>12988 >dielectric muscles and small piezoelectric valves Okay, no problem. Maybe I should have quoted better. I think high voltages could only be used for small moving parts anyways. Bigger motors or muscles would need more ampere, and I don't want to get a shock touching my girlfriend. Or think her of holding a baby...
>>12810 I will model that madokami mecha
Open file (77.71 KB 800x640 Bicep Curl.jpg)
Open file (627.44 KB 1600x1200 2599933619_4f90094024_h.jpg)
I feel like we're overcomplicating things. We should be thinking of this as a simple physics problem: What method gives the best power-to-weight ratio for a simple bicep curl? A 20 inch long blocks split half-way down the middle by a single hinge, pointing straight down with the upper "arm" fixed and a weight attached to the "forearm" and made to curl that weight 180° up using only electricity. The more torque out compared to weight of the arm of that length using an input of X watts DC for Y seconds is the winner. (I'm not sure how many watts or long would be considered reasonable for the experiment) Finding out the most energy efficient way to do this is the key to making knees, elbows, fingers, and probably any other joint we'd need. Because most robots would run on batteries instead of wall outlets, the weight of any inverters would have to be included as part of the arm, because even if it weren't really in the arm, you'd still have the weight in her somewhere. This will likely also make hydraulics and pneumatics impractical even if it were more practical with more limbs. I know this might seem like an oversimplification, but it seems like something that can actually be made into class experiments or a challenge just about anyone could compete in. And I didn't really know how to explain the rule, but no "C-3PO arms", so the blocks have to rest flat against each other, not having a linear motor or cables connecting the bicep to the forearm. If it were a leg that'd be like the back of the thigh connected to a calf, which would get in the way of sitting in a chair. It's not something you could easily hide inside of a human body or clothes and would really get in the way if they were used in prosthetic limbs.
>>13178 Mind explaining that a bit more in-depth Anon? >>13180 >because even if it weren't really in the arm, you'd still have the weight in her somewhere. True. That's one of the challenges a good engineer has to account for, and why the thrown-weight issue is pertinent in any wildly dynamical systems like a robowaifu with all it's limbs and lifelike motions. The Boston Dynamics robot 'dog' Spot is a great example of the design outcome necessary for success at this. All the actuators, batteries, inverters, etc., are kept inboard inside the robot's chassis, and the limbs themselves are kept as simple, rigid, and lightweight as possible. IMO we'll need to attempt something similar to Spot here if we're to succeed at this.
>>13203 The short version: I will literally model and break each and every part of that design down so it can be 3D printed into a model kit as a prototype design. Madokami and all. Now for the long version: I would use existing model kits like megami devices as a reference for part size but start from scratch with the techniques and workflow Ive been practicing since I first showed off a rough draft of Allie. Though that is only the shell of the design. modeling the insides of the thruster equipment would be where the real engineering occurs and would have to use rocket designs for that. schematics for reference. This isnt a sci fi board and i know its a gundam inspired drawing, but I wonder if magnets could be used in the wings to hold up the robo waifu in the air. since magnets that powerful do exist and those wings seem very flimsy with too many bendable parts. I have also 3D printed miniatures using small magnets for the joints before and that works perfectly. Though at the moment the only real problem is that you need another magnet underneath the model or it falls.
>>13205 Excellent. Well I'd say to have at it then Anon! Work hard and I'm sure you'll succeed. >This isnt a sci fi board... We actually had a few similar topics come up when trying to help Fairybot-Anon devise approaches for his literal-flying-mini-robowaifu from years ago. Personally, I consider the fact that drones are so widespread, that IRL flying-fairybot robowaifus will be inevitable eventually.
>>13203 >All the actuators, batteries, inverters, etc., are kept inboard inside the robot's chassis, and the limbs themselves are kept as simple, rigid, and lightweight as possible. I think the automotive term for this is "unsprung mass" >IMO we'll need to attempt something similar to Spot here if we're to succeed at this. I don't really think so. I don't think you can outperform them by aping them. We can't just assume that's the best way to do it just because it's the way the professionals are doing it. My life experience has been that the professionals don't always know best, but people rarely question them because they think there's that significant of a knowledge gap that might not really exist. This YouTube video refers to it as the "Smarter Monkey Fallacy" https://youtu.be/wkiL3Q7cq7A his videos are great even if his presentation is crap. The purpose of simplifying the idea to just bending a lever to lift a weight is so we can get a hundred monkeys at a hundred typewriters trying to solve the problem and anyone could provide a simple solution virtually nobody's thought of yet.
>>13210 >I think the automotive term for this is "unsprung mass" Indeed it is. Thrown-weight is a mechanic's term, which I am.
Open file (480.64 KB 1240x1100 MaiWaifu.jpg)
>>13205 You model her, I'll print her. Honestly, it would be nice if we could work together. I've always wanted to work on a waifu with another Anon. Please make a thread for her, I would be happy to make one for us if you'd like to work together. I'm not good at modelling exteriors but, I am a robotics engineer.
Open file (39.31 KB 800x414 Arm.1.jpg)
>>13180 >no "C-3PO arms", so the blocks have to rest flat against each other, not having a linear motor or cables connecting the bicep to the forearm I'm not buying that. It's not like normal arms work See here
>>13226 A normal, healthy-weight person can bend their leg to a squat where their heels to touch their ass, and can sit upright in a chair with their knees bent 90° and have the back of the knees touching the seat, instead of having a cable extending somewhere from the calf to the ass getting in between the knee and seat. It's better to have that range of motion available for all joints and not need it, than to need it and not have it.
>>13180 >>I feel like we're overcomplicating things. We should be thinking of this as a simple physics problem: What method gives the best power-to-weight ratio for a simple bicep curl? I can't imagine we can get any cheaper type motor that a switched reluctance motor. It's a couple coils and metal rotors. The only thing I can see as better is "Dielectric Elastomers" >>12929 Regular motors are really expensive. All of them cost more than switched reluctance BUT it's not like you can buy switched reluctance motors all over the place because they need micro=controllers and MOSFETs or transistors to drive them. The cost of these has plummeted so to get the exact precise control we need we will need micro-controllers anyways. What do we need for power to run these things? Notice that a average human can only produce about 200 Watts or so of power over a good bit of time with world class athletes at about 400 watts but you can get much higher brief spurts. Power = Force * Distance/Time Where: Power is measured in watt. Force is measured in Newton. Distance is measured in meter. Time is measured in seconds. 1 lbs force = 4.44822162 newtons We'll use 200lbs. force so someone can be picked up 200lb. = 889.64 newtons Call the arm 0.5 meter Time call it a second Power = Force * Distance/Time So 889.64 newtons*0.5meter/1= 444.82watts Now you can easily get a MOSFET that can be driven with 40volts and that gives us 11.12 Amps @ 40 volts. You can get MOSFET's that will do this for $0.50 USD all day long. You need two if you are running a switched reluctance motor and the micro-computer to drive 18 of these you can get for less than $10 USD. Link on force https://www.thecalculator.co/others/Horsepower-Calculator-490.html Link of force humans need to lift stuff. It's much less than the high 200lb. weight I used. https://www.quora.com/How-much-strength-would-you-need-to-lift-a-human-in-the-air?share=1 There's a problem here. 11 Amps is a lot. It takes a #12 wire to carry 20 amps. It takes a #18 AWG to carry 10 amps. https://i.stack.imgur.com/QqXFg.png You could probably cut that in half because it's going to be intermittent and the current carrying capacity depends on the wire heating up which it won't if this power is in brief spurts. So maybe you could use #22 gauge. Lot cheaper. So here's something cheap and a little bigger . "100-ft 20/2 Twisted Doorbell Wire (By-the-Roll)" https://mobileimages.lowes.com/product/converted/032886/032886856167.jpg Stranded would probably be better but not hard to find.
>>13205 >I will literally model and break each and every part of that design down so it can be 3D printed into a model kit as a prototype design. Madokami and all. NICE!
>>13229 >"Dielectric Elastomers" The problem with these is they are new and it's not like you can go out and buy one you have to make them. Of course the advantage of these is exactly the same. You can make them yourself and don't have to go out and buy them.
>>13231 >"Dielectric Elastomers" I forgot to add no one really knows how long these will last or how well they will do. "IF" they work then long term there really seems to be nothing so satisfactory as these for muscles. They seem perfectly ideal in all ways.
Open file (45.88 KB 500x291 co.jpg)
>>13229 Maybe I should repost this in the Meta Thread, because nobody seems to understand what I'm saying. The whole point of the idea was to get people to actually test to prove it and compete to create the most efficient arm, instead of just sitting around discussing and debating methods of actually testing it. Just saying to use a switched reluctance motor and showing a bunch of energy math doesn't really mean anything if you don't even explain where and how the motor is mounted to make the arm move.
>>13236 Where can we get these? I would assume that a smaller scale piston design hidden by some casing might be more efficient but requiring the wiring for sensors like construction vehicles. Diggers specifically. As for the power source, the goal I believe was to make a recharable robowaifu, so either using rechargable drone tier batteries, or some kind of solar power would probably work. Since it probably takes far less energy to grasp an apple than to create lift and maintain flight for prolonged periods of time.
>>12409 In this comment earlier I figured the force directly from pound force, used it to get newtons with an online unit converter. Newtons can be directly substituted for watts. I wasn't sure if this was correct but now using the other formula >>13229 I see the calculations come out the same so it's a good short cut to finding the amps needed at a certain voltage. pound force>convert to newtons>use amount in newtons to directly substitute for number of watts need for force
>>13236 >nobody seems to understand what I'm saying. Your right. You asked what's the best power to weight ratio, what length and how many watts needed. So... There's also a lot of links further up that go to the last thread before this one that go over all this. >The whole point of the idea was to get people to actually test to prove it and compete to create the most efficient arm, instead of just sitting around discussing and debating methods of actually testing it. If you build stuff and have no idea at all what forces are involved, no idea what power(watts) is needed then you are going to do a shit load of work that is not necessary when you could spend 10 minutes getting a ball park figure on what you need. Every time you change any of the weights, forces, etc. you need different wires, strength limbs, etc.. >Just saying to use a switched reluctance motor and showing a bunch of energy math doesn't really mean anything if you don't even explain where and how the motor is mounted to make the arm move. Picture of arm from above. >>13226 Maybe you missed it, The calculations are what you asked for. As for efficiency there's a mass, a ton, a whole lot of literature on what efficiency you can get from different type motors, hydraulics, air pneumatics, etc. It's pointless to just start randomly building stuff without at least using the stuff that people have spent thousands of hours working on the facts of how they work and what the advantages and disadvantages of them are. So no I don't know what you are asking for. The stuff you explicitly asked for a lot of it was given. Even a picture of a normal arms attachments as an idea.
>>13216 Well I also have a 3D printer, anon. If you want to start a thread then go ahead. Getting through the superficial diversity hire barriers in HR has been the only thing stopping me from getting into the field myself.
Open file (21.40 KB 571x749 1627828043983.png)
>>13257 >Your right. You asked what's the best power to weight ratio, what length and how many watts needed. So... I wasn't asking a question, as much as I was proposing standards for an experiment for people to do. I am terrible at writing and explaining things. I should have put the end of the post first: "it seems like something that can actually be made into class experiments or a challenge just about anyone could compete in." That's the point of what I said. Getting people to build and test out a different methods of flexing a single standardized limb, instead of just posting our thoughts here about what's the best way to do it. I guess what I'm trying to propose is a simple community-driven challenge/experiment where we actually try to outperform each other instead of just a bunch of ideas on paper. I wanted to make as many constants as possible to keep the math simple, both so more people will be able to compete and so you don't end up with limbs that are only more efficient because of the scale, and such. I said 20 inches because that was the first thing to come to mind and I couldn't think of any constants for time or wattage, so I just used X & Y. I'd love to hear some better suggestions.
>>13277 > I was proposing standards for an experiment for people to do. I am terrible at writing and explaining things. I should have put the end of the post first: "it seems like something that can actually be made into class experiments or a challenge just about anyone could compete in." That's the point of what I said. Getting people to build and test out a different methods of flexing a single standardized limb, instead of just posting our thoughts here about what's the best way to do it. Ok, you lay out some standards, show a design to test and then build it, "...instead of just posting our thoughts here about what's the best way to do it...". You first. Show us.
How to double the power of magnets with a Hallback Array: https://youtu.be/uQWHjj6ofwo
>>13236 You're right. Building something is better than dreaming up technology. However, there's not gonna be one answer and best method. Whatever, I'm going to work on some arm soon.
Open file (764.66 KB 1400x1700 image.png)
While working on OSRM, I've come to realize that DC cored motors inefficiency is a problem but brushless are too expensive. Coreless motors are where it's at. They're efficient like brushless but cheaper and don't need special controllers that increase costs.
>>13285 >You first. Show us. I will. Sometime between that post and now, I've found I'm going to get fired for not taking the vax. Also I've been working nights, which makes it hard to get anything done without noise complaints. There's also the fact that I know as soon as I post it I'm going to be met with replies about ways to change the experiment. I've already had one comment about how a 180° bend isn't necessary, but expect asking for a standard material and how thick or wide the arm should be, then eventually devolve into why I used an imperial measurement when we should use metric, etc. I expected a major backlash against the idea by people who prefer to just sit around thinking and talking, will find any way they can to ruin this. >>13313 >However, there's not gonna be one answer and best method It's just a general-purpose limb, mostly for bending at the elbow and knee. Scaling down to the fingers probably won't work and it won't be good for flexing face muscles or anything like that, but the application largely depends on what the leading design is. There's not gonna be one answer and best method regardless if the experiment is done or not, so why not do it anyway? It's application isn't just limited to waifubots either.
>>13318 >>I've found I'm going to get fired for not taking the vax That's really sucks. F the vax, F the people trying to force it on people and F the people who engineered corona. What ever you do don't quit. They will try to make you quit. Don't do it. That way they will have no liability. They will really try hard to do this. Watch you'll see. It may very well be that they will some day have to pay you for firing you. Force them to fire you. Of topic but we now have many serious test that show Ivermectin knocks out corona. We even have a whole country of billions, India, that has shown that corona can be stopped fast and eliminated. If they want to stop corona it's as easy as giving everyone Ivermectin, vit. D, and vit. C and corona is done in a few months for a couple dollars per person.
>>13322 >Force them to fire you. That was the plan, if only so it makes it easier to get unemployment if I can't get a new job soon. But please, let's not turn this thread about actuators into a Covid thread. When I leave the job, I'll switch back to sleeping normal hours, and it'll be easier for me to assemble the little CNC machine I bought but never got around to building. I don't trust my hand-eye coordination enough to do cut things by hand.
>>13324 Good luck Anon.
I was about to give up on creating and humanoid robowaifu because I can't afford it but I think this mechanism could be my savior: https://makezine.com/projects/the-chinese-windlass/ I think using this we could create high torque actuators using cheap small motors.
Open file (24.39 KB 620x211 cdn.jpg)
>>13489 I actually mentioned those in the OSRM thread, they are also known as the differential windlass and have incredible efficiency with potential for incredible strength. Using two connected to the motor can provide push and pull forces. https://makezine.com/2014/05/28/rise-robotics-cyclone-muscle/
>>12810 https://youtu.be/ENMZsPwCUcA Capstan Drive: nema stepper motor with no gears?
Anyone got a guide to which joints are safe to put your fingers and other fleshy bits near? Obviously it's not so important on low torque motors, but for life size waifubots you're getting into dangerous territory. I wouldn't want to use anything on a sexbot that might mangle my wangle. Imagine having to explain that one in the hospital.
Nylon actuators seem like a real bad idea also because you'll stress the thread way too much. I don't see why you would choose this method over a simple spool (which has been proven to be reliable and efficient since they use it on cranes) or pair of spools. >who wants their waifu to bench press a car? Patricians.
>>13671 Nylon is dumb as heck for an actuator in a batery and thermal constrained robot. >>13506 ...Why put your rooster near any mechanical joints? Just use an onahole integrated into her pelvis.
>>13506 >...to put your fingers and other fleshy bits near? Redundant sensors are your friend. Also, having the system only use so much force as necessary for each movement. Also, there are the terms 'compliant' and 'backdriveable' THREAD SUBJECT POST LINK The Basement Lounge -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/39.html#4807 @ch: ~288 Actuators for waifu movement! -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/406.html#9198 @ch: ~414 Work on my Elfdroid Sophie -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/4787.html#7675 @ch: ~10 ' backdriveable ' = 3 results >search: backdrivable THREAD SUBJECT POST LINK Actuators for waifu movement! -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/406.html#7086 @ch: ~224 " -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/406.html#8207 @ch: ~218 Work on my Elfdroid Sophie -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/4787.html#7693 @ch: ~98 " -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/4787.html#7695 @ch: ~68 " -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/4787.html#7701 @ch: ~1 ' backdrivable ' = 5 results >search: compliant THREAD SUBJECT POST LINK C++ General -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/12.html#1073 @ch: ~405 R&D General -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/83.html#2048 @ch: ~1500 General Robotics/A.I. news and c -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/404.html#6381 @ch: ~284 " -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/404.html#6919 @ch: ~1138 Actuators for waifu movement! -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/406.html#8207 @ch: ~245 Why consider alternative CPU arc -> https://alogs.theГунтretort.com/robowaifu/res/4506.html#4506 @ch: ~7354 ' compliant ' = 6 results (OT: I would have used crosslinks, but didn't work.) Cycloidal drives with a gear ratio of maximum 10:1 are backdriveable, along James Bruton. A soft outer shell might also help with your concerns.
>>13671 >Nylon ... stress the thread way too much Which thread? I think I recall these actuators to be very reliable. The developers tested them a lot and made this claim, if I recall it correctly. >over a simple spool Because the spool implies a motor, and it might be slower and certainly louder. You could have both. The Nylon is only used if the weight is to high for the other ones. >>13674 >Nylon is dumb as heck for an actuator in a batery and thermal constrained robot We had this several times here on the site. You're thinking in terms of the option of heating the Nylon with electricity. But hot water can be used, which might already be there anyways. It depends on the design of the robot. Like it or not, some might use that approach. Even the method with electric heating might be interesting for some smaller movements, e.g. in the face. Though, dielectric elastomers might be better suited in that case. Nylon actuators are also quite slow, so it's for some special use cases, especially support for other actuators in case of heavy lifting, but not generally useless. Don't judge everything based on your approach.
>>13678 Okay I totally misunderstood the way these things work. From the OP picture it looks like they are motor-based like a simple spool, but the motor is perpendicular and contraction is provided by overtwisting. I am now aware that that is not the case and I'll concede that they actually are cool and potentially useful.
>>13687 What you thought of is a twisted string actuator. I just got my drone motors and want to try those out for that.
>>13678 >heating nylon as a wire and totally not causing a house fire. >Hot water? From where? The cooling system? How would it help movement?
>>13688 Good, that's a genuinely good actuator mechanism and I hope you share your findings. Just know that drone motors require cooling if they are used for more then a few seconds at a time.
>>13689 Please read through the existing information before making some bold posting. There are actuators with thin wires and Nylon. Also, yes, hot water comes from the cooling but could also be heated on purpose if necessary while being plugged in. Actuators help movements by actuating or so, I think.
>>13701 >Please read through the existing information before making some bold posting faggot

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

no cookies?