/robowaifu/ - DIY Robot Wives

Advancing robotics to a point where anime catgrill meidos in tiny miniskirts are a reality.

Reports of my death have been greatly overestimiste.

Still trying to get done with some IRL work, but should be able to update some stuff soon.

#WEALWAYSWIN

Max message length: 6144

Drag files to upload or
click here to select them

Maximum 5 files / Maximum size: 20.00 MB

More

(used to delete files and postings)


Prototypes and failures Robowaifu Technician 09/18/2019 (Wed) 11:51:30 No.418
Post your prototypes and failures.

I'll start with a failed mechanism, may we build upon each others ideas.
>>418
what was the intended function anon? did you ever solve it?
>>957
>Did solve it?
Getting closer, feel free to help.

-pic related are what I've been drawing for a leg mechanism where the foot is always parallel to the trunk, eliminating the need for strong ankle servos. Limits her ability to use them for sexual though, a worthy trade-off to me-
>>958
>feel free to help
I think someone already did anon.
>related
[[807

This simple mechanism already performs the specification you indicated. Just buy one and take it apart if you need to.
>>959
I forgot to mention all leg servos are localized within her hips to lower [the] inertial load [of] her legs on her servos.
>>960
Good idea, but I think you'll discover if you actually take my advice that [the swing-arm] mechanism is perfectly amenable to that design approach. You can think of the whole think upside down from a usual desk arm lamp with the weighted base as representing the mass of your servos. Still works identically. Don't forget to add in appropriately-scaled springs anon.
>>962
Mind giving us more written explanations of your design anon?
>>963
It's system that works like clocks, there's a motor connected directly to the rod which connecting its shaft to the shaft of the next joint. There's a concentric gear around the shafts which moves according to belts which transfer another motors motion to the final fixed gear.
Single motor walking mechanism, made in color to help illustrate its function. Capable of many different angles and speeds depending on lengths.
Simple single motor leg design.
Simplest single motor leg design I can come up with.
>>964
>>965
>>966
>>967
Have you created any physical models to experiment with your designs yet anon? I haven't played with them for a while, but I was thinking you could use K'NEX to prototype with. Maybe 3D-printing the parts? They look interesting BTW. Good luck.
Like I mentioned elsewhere, I'm starting with basic bots, working my way to more complex machines. From left to right – line follower, dancing otto, walking hexapod, obstacle avoidance, bi-directional sumobot, and expanding sumobot. So far only bots 1 and 4 work as intended. The dancing bot version I made is trimmed to use as minimum plastic as possible… its legs keep falling off (no wonder there's a more expensive version that uses metal gear connections). I still couldn't get the hexapod to work since the servo libraries I've tried don't work on an attiny85. I'm currently working on the sumobots which I hope will be able to battle each other.

I'm starting to get the hang of designing and printing parts that actually fit the electronics and any existing modules I have. I start by looking for easy-looking pieces on thingiverse then customizing them further then finally designing pieces from scratch.

After the sumobots I plan to make a toy grade 3D printed RC car that uses phone bluetooth + arduino control as well as an RC tank. Then I think I'll finally be able to make some waifubots, including the 1/8 scale rachnera-san and 1/3 scale wrestler bot.
>>969
>rachnera-san
</monster/ pls.

Wow, looks like you have been been busy anon! Good luck.
>>967
>>968
Tested physically, works but, not that well. Mostly just moves the lower leg segment
>>971
Maybe it would be cheaper/faster to prototype initial designs as cardboard cutouts instead?
Tried making a 10-spoke speed encoder wheel that fits the Tamiya 4WD tires, its too brittle and uneven. My plan is to have the optical speed encoder just arch over the main wheels while they spin, instead of trying to read a separate encoder disc. I will try 5 spokes and wont bother with concave shape, I'll just have the holes flat and square. The diameter with the Tamiya wheels is 28.5mm, one revolution is 9cm, so two revolutions or 10 clicks is exactly one maze block traversed.

>>969
Repost but the sumobots in action:
streamable.com/f2nqs

In the horizontal pic the bots in order of completion are 1,3,4,2,6,5.

Future bots are all waifu types, using some variation of the Fluffytail design and/or 3D doll pieces:

7. Micromouse (has its own current thread)
8. Cattymouse(larger micromouse with stepper motors)
9. Penguingirl balancebot(bluetooth control)
10. Kiwigirl balancebot(using 2.4Ghz RC radio and stepper motors)
11. Fluffy Rachnera-san(12-servo quadruped)
12. Fluffy Wresler(at least 14 metal gear servos)
13. Panzergirl waifutank (torso on tracked tank chassis)
14. Panzergirl devastator (torso on mecanum wheels). 13 and 14 will dress up like pic related.

Unfortunately neither of the future bots will stand taller than 40cm, I do not have the mechanical know-how to design for high torque, high weight applications.

I've noticed in related news, consumer home robots are closing shop: the makers of Kuri, Jibo, Cozmo, Vector. Most of the AI of those robots are in private servers so the bots will essentially die unless the AI is open-sourced.

Apparently the only successful "robots" are the Roomba, Siri, Alexa, Google Home etc. Either single-function tools or subsidized spyware. That is not good.

We must change that. Right now all I can do is work on creating a standard list of serial commands so that all my future waifubots can be controlled through a single universal arduino-compatible controller - either a physical controller that uses bluetooth or 2.4Ghz RC frequencies, or an app. Later waifus will have audio and video processing so I'm hoping I can offload that to a desktop computer.

I'm just sharing this infodump since I hope even though our paths may be plagued by a thousand PLA carcasses, there is a clear vision of what progress should look like, for me at least.
>>973
>13 and 14 will dress up like pic related.
<robowaifu qt tankgrill enforcers
nice.

As for robot shops closing, it's neither unusual nor surprising for a nascent industry to have churn. One great thing that we have on our side is that the Wright Brothers/Henry Ford style home garage operations are a real possibility [for this industry atm], as you and others are proving. We certainly don't want the botnets to be the only possibility for anons to turn to in the future though, so we have to stay focused. Fortunately we still have a few years before they manage to make it illegal to create your own waifu but have to use theirs instead. But it's definitely a race. If we make positive progress first and it becomes widely popular among hobbyists the world over, then we may be able to forestall such a move by the botnet vendors such as Jewgle & Amazon.

There are some command protocol works already out there, have you had a look at any of them?

Keep up the good work anon!

Sorry for off-topic OP
>>974
Thanks man. It is indeed the only industry I can think of that is truly still in the garage phase. Actual laws regulating humanoid robots don't exist yet outside of science fiction stories, so this is still a window of opportunity before corporate takes over.

>There are some command protocol works already out there, have you had a look at any of them?

I'm taking a look at various arduino smartcar bluetooth controller apps for Android, will try to find some common string between them so you can just download any one of them to control my bots.
>>975
>so this is still a window of opportunity before (((corporate))) takes over.
Exactly. But no one should just relax because there's a gap for now, and assume they just won't try to stop it. They will. We just have to move faster so there will simply be far too broad access to basic robowaifus before they can stonewall it.
Open file (1.72 MB 3264x2448 IMG_20200723_184329.jpg)
Open file (1.58 MB 3264x2448 IMG_20200723_184543.jpg)
Open file (1.70 MB 2448x3264 IMG_20200723_184407.jpg)
My biggest failure in general was getting distracted and frustrated because of problems like computer failures and all kinds of things aka life. I need to avoid mind blockades, like doing sth only when I archived something else first (which doesn't happen then). Good example might be, not buying a 3d printer until one has learned CAD. Then not being motivated enough to learn it, which wouldn't be a problem if one had bought the printer first. My biggest failure in so far in regard to outcome was overestimating the power of magnets, and therefore believing I could build a simple muscle based on that. I wanted to have piece of metal attached to a nylon string, getting dragged through a flexible tube. Somehow with magnets lined up outside of the muscle. I found out small pieces of metal cant hold much, and a bit of plastic isolates it quite good. 🤦🏼‍♂️ The other failure maybe isn't one, it's rather a bit of prototyping and testing. Though it failed in so far as I got stuck. Since I couldn't wait for my printer, which I want to buy after I moved, I started prototyping molds for thighs with pulpe aka pappmache and plaster (pics realated). However, I would've needed liquid foam at some point, but I had difficulties to buy that where I live, so I stopped working on it. The approach isn't really good anyways, bc I wont be able to mirror two legs to make them fit together. I know that, though I think it might motivate me to look into building joints, using electronics to move them a bit and so on.... Better than doing nothing!
>>4429 >Better than doing nothing! 1000% better, at least! :^) Actually, laying up laminates (like pappmache) is probably a good idea fundamentally. I'd suggest something like wheat paste for the adhesive instead of plaster to keep the result lighter weight.
>>4430 In that case here it's about a mold not an exoskeleton, weight doesn't matter. But you're right about us needing to use a lot of layers for the outside. It's because sensors and cooling tubes.
>>4435 >But you're right about us needing to use a lot of layers >a lot I'm not sure I would put it just that way, after all from the ME aspect, lightweight is king. It's just that laminar structures can offer improved strength to weight ratios. For example, plywood is an a good type of laminar sheet with good properties (though generally probably too heavy for our specific use-case).
>>4437 We all have different approaches and varying priorities, so general assumtions don't work. I want to put in quite powerful motors and muscles, but bipedal walking isn't so important at the beginning. The first ones only need to bend their knees, spread their legs, and at some point turn around in bed on their own, ... The legs shouldn't be to light, bc this would feel strange if I would holding them up. Later iteration would be walking on all fours to the bathroom.
I spent all of yesterday trying to get a 3D model to use as a basis to start planning, and all of today trying to start it putting it together. Not only is my computer a potato and declines to work with the more complex meshes that I try to throw at it, but even taking a full minute between movement and actions I get crashes. Not that the crashes matter though, honestly I have no idea how to put the pieces of this mesh together. I've been trying to figure out which face is the top face, the bottom face, and even after going through a few hours of lectures and tutorials I am still no closer than I was a couple days ago despite the work put in. I think I have a fix, but I can't be sure. I have a spare computer I got for cheap when a buddy of mine upgraded with a better gpu, which should help, but also just making an approximated model by hand instead of trying to assemble an accurate model so that I may refine it as I go could make things run far smoother. Hard to tell though. A bit of a pain to have wasted a couple days though, I will admit.
>>4537 Fuck it, I'm going analog. Clay, physical references, a drawing board, and hand calculations only for the physical design. I'm not going to mass manufacture, so there is no need for computer designs. Clay and paper are far easier to manipulate and measure with.
>>4537 What program did you try?
>>4539 Fusion 360. Solid tool, but the files I used were fairly bulky, my computer is a potato, and I am not as experienced as I maybe should be, so I don't blame the program itself. I've had far more sculpting experience than CAD experience, and it seems to be working better, although not by much. At the very least, it is making me rethink my approach.
I looked into it myself, without trying, since I need to rebuild my laptop, only have a Raspi and tablet working right now, and these would really be to weak: >>4549
Open file (1.64 MB 3264x2448 IMG_20200801_211920.jpg)
I'm working on a similar spine than posted here: >>4563. It's just meant to be a test and early prototype, till I'll get my printer. The plastic is the lid/cap from water containers, I have some springs and two types of little spheres. Also some metal parts where a little fiber or line can run through, but I don't know their name. I can tell so far that it's annoying to build. I put these little metal parts into some plastic hole and in between the end of a spring so they would hold the spring in place. Sometimes it works, sometimes I just won't get these into the spring. Then again, they won't hold the spring well, but thery are to short to put a washer in. Also, it's generally just trial and error. I want to get the idea how a spine could work.
>>4653 That sounds great Anon, keep experimenting. I like that you are using spare parts laying around to test things out with. Doing that will help us all understand how you would go about creating a robowaifu inexpensively. Don't be too annoyed at difficulties, just be patient and methodical. Remember that in a real factory situation (even a tiny factory of your own devising) manufacturing almost always spends the resources needed to create helpful rigs that help assemble/manufacture things. Be thinking about some kinds of rigs that might help you in the future as you're figuring out how to assemble parts. >I want to get the idea how a spine could work. That's both a neat goal, and an important topic. We won't be able to have good robowaifus without having good spines Anon, so work hard at it! Thanks for sharing this here with us Anon.
Open file (97.11 KB 1532x948 eyeball.png)
Open file (42.65 KB 1532x948 avril-lips.png)
Open file (80.97 KB 1532x948 PM35S-Lever-01.png)
Open file (98.34 KB 1532x948 disc-holder.png)
I needed to a bit of a break from my software project(s). But I'm still on it! I finally started to get more serious about CAD, software will have to wait a little bit. I already tried out some stuff before, like beginning an eyeball were I wanted to put a camholder and magnets inside, also flexible lips out of TPU, possibly at some point an airmuscle with silicone rubber on the outside. I learned that I can import pictures into Solvespace to use it as pattern, which is exactly what I wanted. I used Avril Lavinge as pattern. However, I didn't get very far due lack of knowledge on how to use Solvespace and also made some conceptual mistakes. Now I finally got through some tutorials, being in a more relaxed mood and started to design a holder and lever for some small servo (PM35S) which I have for testing and maybe for an elbow. I also had the idea of using washers in a little case as holder for some axis. The holder can have an arm going into the disc which can rotate freely. It's a cheap and thin axle bearing if one has no ball bearing or there's no space for it. So, that's not much, but still something. I will post more about those projects in the correct threads as soon as I archived something more. Doing this feels often better than working on software, since it's easier to have some result and hold it in my hands (after printing), even if something is wrong with it.
>>8034 Glad to see you're still going strong Anon! It's good to take a break from time to time and focus on other things. 'Variety is the spice of life' they say. I hope you succeed at the designs. I really like the fact you're trying to find extremely economical approaches to designs like the washer-as-axle-bearing. This sort of rigging is what will enable many more men eventually to find ways to create robowaifus on their own. I suppose if you put some kind of seal enclosure around the whole thing, then you could put machine grease into it for durability. I hope you come up with lots of new designs this year Anon! :^)
>>8034 Keep up the good work Anon. >>8038
Open file (87.40 KB 1479x968 lower_arm_V1a.png)
Open file (40.30 KB 1512x967 nose-lower-part-V1.png)
Open file (69.32 KB 1389x908 tube_connector_V1.png)
Open file (91.19 KB 1920x1016 lips_4_parts.png)
I'm preparing a print for a very simple forearm right now. Didn't start printing yet, we'll see how it's going. It's TPU, which is not easy to print. I want to build at least something, ASAP, to demonstrate some progress. However, this is not a forearm with motors or muscles, but a soft TPU+foam placeholder, which is supposed to be connected to a elbow with a little servo. More a visual improvement than anything else. From there, we'll see how it goes. I also started to design other parts, but it's not easy. The arms and legs of a human are not round, but more complex shaped, which makes it more difficult to get it right. Also, I need not only molds or some TPU enclosure, but also air muscles and pseudo muscles to fill the inside of the body.
>>8350 Good on you anon! The more functional parts such as joints, hinges, levers and mounting plates that we have, the better! Even placeholder CAD for servos and servo horns are useful and can save other designers time when they are planning their robowaifu parts.
>>8350 Oh cool. Glad to see some new design progress Anon. Yeah, I've often thought about all the void spaces within a robowaifu's outer shells and how can we utilize that volume.
Open file (195.76 KB 1504x1100 Imagepipe_10.jpg)
>>8350 I delayed my TPU forearm print bc my print didn't stick to the bed. I had gluestick on it, but heated the bed after the first layer. I guess this was the mistake, the PVA disintegrated. I will try again with a advanced design in a while. I need to come up with a solution for designing arm and leg shapes in CAD. The print would have cost 7-8€ and I want to have a better design before I drop so much fillament into it.
>>8371 After the fail with TPU I wanted to make a simpler print with a outer shell out of more expensive PLA and a inner core of cheaper PLA. To make the core bigger and the shell thinner, I changed the design. I tried different variants, but Solvespace always exports a mesh with a strange error. Maybe a bug, idk. Big F. Whatever, I might print the original model, still with a PLA core instead of foam, but bigger outer shell then I would like to have. Or, since I'm working on improving those designs anyways, maybe I won't print any of it now. I like printing parts, but it has to make some sense.
>>8372 That error looks like some kind of pole (the 3D mesh technical term). Any chance you might have some kind of vertices begin collapsed down together in your model?
>>8373 >being collapsed down*
>>8373 It's not a sculpt and I don't know much about vertices. It's rendered from a CAD file. It actually doesn't show up as error in a MeshLab (non-manfold edges).
>>8350 I'm still on it. Since I have these little PM35S motors, but they have no means to hold a arm, I have to work something out. Like mentioned here >>5034 I was on my way to build a whole construction around it, to hold the motor in the middle. I stopped this approach for now, and work on a disk attached to the motor and holding the lever which is attached to a rather complex washer. Note: Don't buy motors without mount for some lever or arm. >>8372 For now I only printed out the simplest version of the forearm shell in some cheap PLA, which is quite heavy bc I used to many perimeters. I might only use this as as stand to put hands on top of it and have them moving for tests. It's more or less just like a heavy vase with two perimeters, but without bottom. >>thighs I want to try now, to build legs and arms out of 4-8 parts, the problem is to align them. Not sure if that will ever succeed. Maybe it will be enough to print some structure out of TPU to hold other parts inside and will need some smoothing on the outside by adding fabric and silicone rubber.
>>8456 That's an interesting looking design Anon. I hope you get everything sorted to your satisfaction. One thing I'm learning for myself is that I have to start out on something literally as simple as I can, b/c that's usually just about as hard as I can successfully manage on my own. Once I solve one small step, then I usually back up and look at what I've managed to do that time and that often gives me guidance on where to go next. So, I just make dozens and dozens of little steps like that until I succeed. Takes some patience, but it usually works for me as long as I just don't quit. Keep at it Anon! :^)
>>8460 >just don't quit I won't. Though, I might soon be busy for more than one month with moving. I'll try to still do something in that time. After that, I'll have more space to set up workplaces for different areas which we need to cover. Doing CAD mostly works fine while listening to podcasts, talks on YouTube or audiobooks.
>>8464 I hope you have a successful move Anon. I should be moving myself in the next couple of months as well. I'm trying to get better at programming, and also thinking about our operating system/computer hardware choices to help make robowaifus safe, secure, and reliable. It's a big area to understand it all! Anyway, everyone helping everyone else here goes a long way towards us all moving forward together.
Open file (212.46 KB 1092x1104 Failing_towards_success.jpg)
>>8456 Just some upgrade: I managed to find a solution how to build a holder for that motor, but it took me a lot of trying around. Felt quite fine working on it, for a while, but towards the end I started to get more and more distracted by other things. Probably bc I had enough of it. I also assumed that this cheap little motor is going to work, but didn't look into it. Turned out, if it's going to work I'll need a special driver or setup with a H-Bridge. Whatever, I'm currently focused on learning and training CAD, so there's no rush. It was more about learning how to solve a problem and generally about dealing with that specific one. Turned out, I wasn't thinking enough about it before getting started. After trying complex designs, a rather simple solution works now. I'll upload the file soon, maybe later today.
>>8561 Actually, your persistence is laudable Anon. Just keep at it. >After trying complex designs, a rather simple solution works now. This isn't uncommon. Many designs can only achieve simplicity after the complex route has revealed the elegant route. Not only is this true in design and engineering, but in things like writing as well. There's a well-known quote written by the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal: >"I have made this longer than usual because I have not had time to make it shorter." Pretty much every piece of software I've ever cared enough about to spend enough time to pay attention to it's structural design has been through this basic process.
Open file (125.15 KB 1374x945 PM35S_tubholder_V2b.png)
Open file (482.86 KB 1535x2048 hamcat_mqq-28.jpg)
>>8561 I linked the upload here, in the skeleton thread >>8584 >>8568 Thanks for your encouraging words. But this was me scolding myself for not using my time better. I could do more. Next project: Early hamcat_mqq-style ball-joints. One thing I ask myself while starting: How round do these ball-joints need to be. Can they be a bit flat on one side? Pear-shape to reduce some material on the other side?
>>8585 Thanks for the pic of the hamcat_mqq Anon. That looks remarkably like the simplistic armature design I myself have been working towards. I may try to integrate your fittings/joints design in my own efforts. Thanks for your work.
>>8588 >hamcat_mqq more of his stuff is in the projects dump: >>7707
Open file (186.56 KB 1504x1262 Imagepipe_12.jpg)
>>8585 I was doing ball-joints today. Print-in-place was a difficulty, this means printing a mechanism at once, which then needs to break some supports of and being moveable. I got it working, by adding a hole to the bottom, so I could use a screwdriver to disconnect it from the ground of the cup. However, I'm still able to get the ball out and in again, which makes it pointless. It will most likely be better to print the parts separately, which makes them print cleaner. Currently it doesn't move smoothly.
>>8661 That's a neat idea about how to do mechanisms though. Just keep trying until you perfect things Anon. You get there! :^)
Open file (69.37 KB 1388x948 ball-joint-V4.png)
>>8662 I think I have to be careful with the print-in-place idea. It's not necessary and trying to make it work is eating most of my time with every prototype I design. Printing parts separate also means they are cleaner and therefore run smoother. Though, it's probably so, that we'll need to add something to the outer shell of the sphere (ball) anyways, to make it smooth when moving but also having more grip. I was thinking about silicone rubber, but not sure yet. However, this is one more reason to print the parts separate.
>>8690 I like the way you're coloring/rendering those parts in the diagrams. Makes them easier to understand actually.
Open file (186.40 KB 1433x1504 Imagepipe_13.jpg)
>>8698 Yeah, but I should have converted the last pic into a jpeg, 5MB is obscene, the jpeg has 200K or so. These pics are the actual models, just with everything hidden. They look like that when I'm working on them, just with additional lines and points. The pic here shows the difference in quality between print-in-place (middle) and separated (bottom). Don't mind the little gap in the bottom sphere, I'm printing with 15% infill. Also, the bottom sphere is bigger, bc I wanted to test if I would still get it into the cup if I increase the size of the sphere 10% (Answer: No).
>>8699 Actually to my eye, it seems you're already coming up with nice shapes. Put something like that through a resin printer and you would basically have production-ready parts ready to ship off to manufacturing. You're making great progress Anon. Please continue doing so! :^)
>>8699 BTW, Anon posted a video about an android leg that uses a big ball-and-socket joint for an ankle. >>8704
I was playing around with the idea of re-creating the mechanism of the InMoov neck accuator after my posting here >>8718. I didn't look at the details, just trying it on my own. The first part (pic 1) wasn't printable, even with these supports. It's to steep. Number two also wasn't that great. Don't know how to describe it well: The outer rails were too thin, since it's only the edges that turn. I played around with some changes, but nothing made sense. I was able to print it, but it was quite dirty. The third try was more similar to the original design. First I got it wrong again, but I'm sure V3 would work. I didn't really try to print it yet, but it looks the same than the original and I printed that already. The details matter, the outer lines have to be curvy. You can see it in the part I marked. Picture number four is the shoulder part for the doll >>8585. I didn't print it yet and it will need some adjustments till it's really finished. I partially disassembled my printer to exchange the heatbrake, so let's hope I won't break anything.
>>8760 This is actually really informative watching your progress and following your thinking Anon. You're already able to design a wide array of parts, it's pretty encouraging to see.
Open file (85.71 KB 1287x948 shoulder-joint-V2a-1.png)
Open file (88.75 KB 1287x948 shoulder-joint-V2b-1.png)
Open file (131.88 KB 1287x948 shoulder-joint-V3a-1.png)
Open file (95.47 KB 1287x948 shoulder-joint-V4a-1.png)
Open file (81.54 KB 1287x948 shoulder-joint-V4a-2.png)
>>8760 I had some trouble with my printer after finally replacing the heatbreak with a all-metal one. Also some other distractions. I did still work a little bit on a prototype for a alternative shoulder joint, which is not a ball-joint. The blue part is supposed to be constraint to the body, the green part can then slide sideways on it, but is also supposed to tilt up and down. For lifting the arms sideways. Though the later I'll have to figure out by printing prototypes, which I can't do right now. The current design probably wouldn't work. I need to figure out the details and maybe add another moving part as well. The grey disc is a placeholder for a metal disc with bearings, so a attached arm on it could move without friction. This is for lifting the arm in front and back of the body. I wanted to have a holder for the disk integrated into the design at first, but realized that I want my parts to be printable with no or minimal supports. I need one plane side for that. So I added a hole to the later version of the design, for adding the disc with a holder using a screw. I might integrate some metal bearings into the other parts later as well, but this should be optional. However, I decided to build a prototype at some time (shipping problems currently) which will use motors in the chest and strings to move the shoulder. The idea is, that the strings can then later be replaced by airmuscles or other ones, so the motors shouldn't be necessary anymore. Though some might still be part of the design as a fallback solution. Since there won't be a motor in the shoulder the "bone" itself can therefore be kept small and be surrounded by some soft material. So her shoulder can look feminin and be soft like a human one. Btw, I'll plan to upload the files soon and also opening a Mega account so I won't need to use Catbox all the time. For now, in that case the idea is more important than the current execution anyways, and the signal that I'm still operational as well.
>>9142 Btw, the empty spaces in the middle of the organic looking part in the shoulder joint are for separating that part into two parts, for printing. So each one has a plane foundation, which will be on the printbed. They could be screwed or glued together, or I might later add some more space for a layer of machined metal inside, so they would be more durable. I will need to add contacts into the design as well, since I want to keep bending cables to a minimum. The hard parts of the joints are supposed to transfer energy and data through the body. The sliding parts need at least two metal layers to transport current, data might use some form of light communication based on LEDs with different colors. I still have to watch quite some videos on human anatomy and also read a little bit about it. There will also need to be a lot of trial an error. Then, I also spend some time trying to create a human-like ribcage in CAD. Not with much success. I used pictures from some scanned parts which I downloaded from Thingyverse or a similar site. It turned out to be hard to do that in Solvespace, at least with my skills. However, I want to do as much as possible in CAD instead of scultping, because it's easier to manipulate these files to add something later. So I'll try again at some point, probably after improving my skills in using the program first.
>>9143 I also found a front part, which would fit quite well to the chest of a hard-shell robot, but might also be interesting to print in a flexible material. It's a booby plate armor design, inspired by The Mandalorian. https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2888954 I'm going to add this to the skeleton and armature thread as well, but only together with some other pics on my other device. I mention it here solely because it might be useful for adding a female look to some ribcage design very fast. Also, because it's part of the next picture. I used Dia, to put some of my pictures of prototypes and pictures of patters I want to use together, into a kind of diagram of what I'm working on. So I can have a overview and decide where I want to try next to push something forward. The pictures are sorted to some extend, to be circa at the place where the parts would fit into a build of a body.
These are excellent posts Anon. Seeing your design progress is inspiring. I'm particularly glad to see you working on the shoulder-girdle and ribcage areas. I think about those a lot and did a small study on the design and kinematics of the shoulder-girdle back in school. It's an amazing design actually. Keep up the good work, and may you have good success at it! :^)
Open file (59.25 KB 1226x948 ribcage-V2b-pic05.png)
Open file (348.83 KB 1226x948 ribcage-V2b-pic04.png)
Open file (59.63 KB 1226x948 ribcage-V2b-pic03.png)
Open file (64.00 KB 1226x948 ribcage-V2b-pic02.png)
Open file (51.57 KB 1226x948 ribcage-V2b-pic01.png)
>>9144 So, I was watching videos on how to get a ribcage and shoulders right in CAD, because that's what worries me. I hope I'll try out Blender soon. However, after watching some video on how to draw a chest I got inspired. My problem might really be that I'm not trained in drawing people, and I found it's worth looking into that. I really wanted to do a ribcage ,build like a human one. Starting from drawing a chest I tried something else, what you can see on the pictures. One also shows the amount of complexity by showing all the lines. This is of course once again just crude prototyping which might not lead very far. Also, FYI this is meant to be printed in TPU when it's finished. So I might still put in some ribs on the outside (in PLA), but mainly for show to make them visible through the skin, without really having a full ribcage. The thick parts of the prototype would be made thinner or hollowed out to hold parts like small computers and such. Btw, here a no tiddies bc its not the outside, there would still go at least a a layer of power mesh with silicon on top of it. Also, it's far from finished, just wanted to give an update. The video was on a male ribcage anyways, so I have to feminize it anyways. I want our waifus to have a bit unrealistic waist to hip ratio (wasp-like), tbh. Like they would be wearing a corset. I also put some silicon on top of a small printed face of Sophie to check if it sticks. Even without thinning it, so that it goes better into all the cavities it actually does. Silicone is known to not stick very well to anything that silicone, it only sticks better by having a huge surface to hug onto. I'm thinking of making experiences with some silicone on plastic faces. This isn't really the my preferred way, since I would rater like to create a skull and then add soft silicone parts, but one step at the time. My printer is still not working, if you are wondering why I don't try to print some parts. I'm working on it, from time to time, but have to keep an eye on my frustration management.
>>9620 > it's far from finished, just wanted to give an update. That's fine Anon, I'm glad you did! It's enjoyable watching how you progress in your work to the final products. > I want our waifus to have a bit unrealistic waist to hip ratio (wasp-like), tbh. Like they would be wearing a corset. I think that's a really good idea from a character-appeal perspective. However, it may prove a little tricky that way from an engineering perspective. For example, Sophie Anon's challenges fitting all her new eye gear inside her head. Regardless, I'm sure you'll manage Anon. BTW, any idea what's wrong with your printer ATM?
>>9620 >My problem might really be that I'm not trained in drawing people, and I found it's worth looking into that. You are absolutely correct Anon. Life drawing is basically the key to being able to 'see' how anatomy works. There are a large number of drawing tutorials out there in many places on the Internet. Our webring's own /loomis/ has some too: https://anon.cafe/loomis/res/628.html#628 Good luck. It takes time, but you'll eventually get it if you just don't quit.
The important thing about >>9620 is that I realized that a really should work with subtraction in CAD. I had the wrong idea that I would need to keep my models ultra simple and also ideally not render something to then cut something of it away afterwards. Sense of perfection or the goal of keeping it simple can stand in one's way sometimes. Assembling of different files also works in Solvespace, but it is a pain to do with rather organic parts that don't really fit into each other, have to overlay partially, but still don't fit very well (see my try on a thigh in >>8456). >>9621 Don't want to discuss my printer problems here ( in this thread), that's why I didn't mention the specifics. I already have tutorials and advice, but thanks for asking. >>9622 Some of the /loomis/ examples are directly useful, thanks. I'll have to look into how to use wget or curl to get all the images. Many are more interesting for drawing then for creating a 3D model, but I can use some of them. Also, maybe I might want to learn drawing one day.
>>9631 >...Sense of perfection or the goal of keeping it simple can stand in one's way sometimes. I'll presume you are referring to the psychological state known as perfectionism in the first part here? While this is definitely a hindrance in many ways to a man's progress in whatever given field, I consider the latter to be practically a law for success. Conflating the two together is a fallacy. The former is a kind of obstinate drive to perfect one's perceived notion or ideal about a thing or a system. These perceptions are obviously, necessarily, a priori, incomplete. This pursuit is on the face of it misguided in a fundamental way, and will certainly lead to one's personal pain and suffering. Balance in all things, and knowing when to quit are two important characteristics of a man's growth to maturity. You'll never get things perfect in this life. Good enough is, well, good enough. :^) However, the latter 'law' of simplicity is the primary effective means ever discovered that lets men tackle the absolutely unchangeable nature of the world around us. It's one of the rather few means at our disposable in our ever-running 'battle' with The Second Law of Thermodynamics (commonly known as Entropy). https://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/k-12/airplane/thermo2.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_law_of_thermodynamics The insulting mnemonic phrase 'Keep It Simple Stupid', while a good admonition, is actually a blatant misnomer. Only the 'stupid' man doesn't work to keep things simple in their lives. The intelligent man works hard to do so. This should be instead: Keep It Simple, Smartguy When you're dealing with the monumental complexity of devising a working, IRL, autonomous gynoid robotic companion -- which we as a team here on /robowaifu/ are endeavoring to -- then keeping it simple is literally the only possible pathway for us to eventual success. >tl;dr Put simply, all things around us tend to disorder. "Keep it simple" is a good way to keep this manageable, and maintain both order and sanity.
>>9631 >Some of the /loomis/ examples are directly useful, thanks. I'll have to look into how to use wget or curl to get all the images. I can look into compiling an archive of the whole board and posting it for you somewhere Anon. Might also turn out to be a good resource for more than just /robowaifu/'s use tbh.
Open file (110.08 KB 1424x948 ribcage-V2f-01.png)
Open file (97.61 KB 1424x948 ribcage-V2f-02.png)
Open file (42.05 KB 1424x948 Genera_hand-V1a.png)
Open file (50.73 KB 1424x948 Genera_hand-V1b.png)
Open file (28.98 KB 1424x948 Genera_hand-V1b-extr.png)
I didn't really archive much to report recently. I worked a bit on the chest, to put in spaces for ribs in another material and was also starting to work on a long term project of building the bones of a hand out of layers, which could then be PCBs (electronics) with sensors, plastics for the form and metal parts for strength. I also got some more stuff from AliExpress, but didn't really work with it. Some motors will arrive soon. I had some problems with my Raspi. I thought it was the software or my disc, since it got slower and slower, but it was the SD card which failed a while later. I finally looked into getting a new PC, which took me some time because I had to find out what to buy in the current situation and how to get it. I also finally worked on getting my Laptop running, which is weak, but better than my Raspi3. I had troubles to work on my design on my Raspi, I had to wait to often. I also had to look into not missing out too much on business opportunities, which I ignored in favor of my main dedication here. Not sure how much time I'll have during the next two month, but I'll work at least a little bit on my designs and with my new things. Though this might not lead to immediate results.
I also finally fixed this >>8372 >>8373 - In the configuration, the export chord tolerance (in mm) needs to be the same than chord tolerance (in percentage) which is also shown in mm.
>>10292 Ahh, good detective work.
>>10291 >I worked a bit on the chest, to put in spaces for ribs in another material and was also starting to work on a long term project of building the bones of a hand out of layers, which could then be PCBs (electronics) with sensors, plastics for the form and metal parts for strength. I've thought often about the field of Neuromorphic computing, specifically as it relates to designing/engineering robowaifus. Using structural and other ancillary parts embedded with sensors, batteries, microcontrollers, wiring, electronics parts, etc., right inside the structural and actuator components is not only very bio-mimetic in design essence, it also is very likely to help bring the extreme high-performance characteristics of neuromorphics to the table. For example, embedding temperature sensors directly within the finger bones, and also keeping the robowaifu's self-protection 'sense/react response cycle' to pull away from the heat, say, all 'short-circuited' locally right inside a simplified hand-local electronics/microcontroller/actuator system. This design approach can allow the response times for such a system to be very fast relative to a more traditional, hierarchically-networked command & control mechanisms. Basically, in a somewhat similar way to biologic adrenergic nervous system response mechanisms, you want to push the 'computation' for such a system out to the edges of the physical structure, and not be so dependent with always 'phoning home'' first to the higher-level computation systems of the robowaifu's 'mind'. This latter approach encompasses costly communications and other delays. Not that the signals wouldn't be sent on their way 'back up the chain' though. You definitely want the ability of higher-level control to override lower-level ones when needed. Forging ahead into dangerous environments to protect her master for instance, even when doing so conflicts with the most basic of self-preservation dictums. This round-trip would hopefully be completed within milliseconds (vs. the hopefully microseconds-level desired for pure local response times). My apologies for my probably confusing writing here Anon. This is a complicated topic and it's difficult for me to describe it concisely.
>>10297 As an additional thought on the specific example of HOT! PULL HAND AWAY IMMEDIATELY! example, the control devices could perhaps either open, or reuse, an emergency response communications channel up to further-up actuator systems in the robowaifu's skeletal chain. So for example, the hand-local would attempt to instantly flex fingers back, but then emergency-response channels can be opened to the wrist, elbow, shoulder, and torso actuators, all in a tiered-priority chain, to enable fully pulling the hand entirely away from the danger, same as we ourselves would do accidentally touching a hot iron for instance. Each of these chained-actuators would quickly add their own kinematic dynamic in the movement, and the effect would be propagating and progressive. The idea behind the 'emergency response' is that the higher-level analysis would be bypassed in a first-order response time, simply to quickly save the robowaifu from immediate damage.
>>10298 One additional thing that will need to be solved for this hypothetical situation. As we grow up, our entire physical being develops a kind of physical awareness that let's us intuitively discern where sensations are coming from in our body by mere touch, and usually more or less instantly. Vision and audio, for instance, are not needed to know you've just touched a /comfy/ soft blanket, or a cold ice cube spilled onto the counter. And not only do you recognize immediately these kinds of sensorial cues basically immediately, you also know where (to a first approximation) the touched item of interest is located, relative to your general body position. Again this is all instinctive to us, and happens 'automatically' with little attention needed for most cases to figure these things out. Back to the HOT! emergency response, the robowaifu's system will need some kind of touch location-finder mechanism so she knows instantly where the hot plate is, and which way to yank her hand back out of danger. If this isn't done accurately, she could make a clumsy move in the reaction, and possibly damage herself, you, or something else. Again, this is something we all develop instinctively as we grow up, but for us as designers and engineers we'll have to solve this kind of thing explicitly. I'd guess that a first-approximation approach would be to keep a general sense of all the items in her local body space area's surface normal. This should at the least give her the direction to quickly move out of the contact danger (ie, out along the surface normal of the object and away). This situational-awareness solution needs to account that this 'normal-map' of her environment is dynamic, as both she and the elements in her environment are potentially in motion with respect to each other. This is really quite a remarkable domain to tackle from a systems-engineering perspective. Now that I've been applying myself to consider some of the many things all needed, most other design & engineering endeavors seem rather boring to me now. :^)
>>10299 Also, once you check my digits another thing we might do is develop a sort of 'contact-pad volumetric triangulation' sensor model. The idea is you have many tiny pressure, etc. pads embedded into the robowaifu's 'skin'. Whenever she touched something, and approximation of it's shape (and by implication, it's surface normals) can be quickly simulated in her world model. For example, if 18 different pads on two of her fingertips all register a contact, then based on the kinematic/skeletal/etc body model simulation of her current physical position, then she can 'triangulate' the surface shape of that object at it's contact points with her fingers. Again, all instinctive for us...but for her will need to be explicitly worked out in advance by trial and error during design.

Report/Delete/Moderation Forms
Delete
Report

Captcha (required for reports)

no cookies?